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12 killer apps for linux

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Software

These are applications that provide me with the reasons that I’ve been using linux for the last 11 years. These are my killer apps – the reason I use linux on the desktop both at home and at work.

1. mplayer

mplayer is a light weight, full featured media player. In fact it’s so light weight, it doesn’t even bother with a gui. Just run it from a terminal, and up pops a simple window showing the video and the video only. Manipulating the video (fast forward, pause, toggling subtitles, volume controls etc) is done through keyboard commands, which quickly become second nature. Mplayer plays any video or audio codec/container you can name and supports a number of display drivers, including displaying video on a terminal using ascii.

2. kwin

The humble window manager is an often overlooked part of a desktop software stack. However, if like me, you swap between the mainstream desktop OSes – Windows, OSX – and linux, you certainly notice it when it’s not up to scratch.

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