Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

12 killer apps for linux

Filed under
Software

These are applications that provide me with the reasons that I’ve been using linux for the last 11 years. These are my killer apps – the reason I use linux on the desktop both at home and at work.

1. mplayer

mplayer is a light weight, full featured media player. In fact it’s so light weight, it doesn’t even bother with a gui. Just run it from a terminal, and up pops a simple window showing the video and the video only. Manipulating the video (fast forward, pause, toggling subtitles, volume controls etc) is done through keyboard commands, which quickly become second nature. Mplayer plays any video or audio codec/container you can name and supports a number of display drivers, including displaying video on a terminal using ascii.

2. kwin

The humble window manager is an often overlooked part of a desktop software stack. However, if like me, you swap between the mainstream desktop OSes – Windows, OSX – and linux, you certainly notice it when it’s not up to scratch.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Second Alpha Build of Liquid Lemur Linux 2.0 Brings LibreOffice 5, Based on Debian 8

Edward Snyder, the creator and maintainer of the Debian-based Liquid Lemur Linux distribution, has announced the release and immediate availability for download of the second Alpha build of the upcoming Liquid Lemur Linux 2.0 distro. Read more

Manjaro Linux 0.8.13.1 Fluxbox Edition Gets Linux Kernel 4.1 LTS, Download Now

The Manjaro Linux team, through Bernhard Landauer, has proudly announced the release of an updated version of the Manjaro Linux Fluxbox Edition, namely 0.8.13.1, which features an updated Linux kernel and numerous improvements. Read more

NVIDIA reveals GPUs for blade servers, Linux desktop support

VMworld 2015 NVIDIA has announced the second version of its Grid desktop virtualisation software, complete with a pair of GPUs for blade servers. NVIDIA is pitching GRID as a hardware offering tuned to the needs of graphically-demanding desktop virtualisation (VDI) workloads. If that sounds a bit exotic, consider environments like the resources industry, where on-site engineers need CAD and modelling tools, but miners are loathe to deploy desktops in the remote sites where stuff gets dug out of the ground. VDI works a treat in such spots. Read more

GNU Linux-libre 4.2-gnu is now available

Many new drivers required cleaning of their blob-requesting-and-loading machinery. Various others needed deblobbing updates due to blob name changes and false positives. Read more Also: