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Kernel Log: Llano support, union filesystems

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Linux

Late on Monday night, Linus Torvalds issued the third release candidate for Linux 3.0. With this RC, the kernel has been extended to support the graphics core of AMD's Llano processors which were introduced on Tuesday – it seems that Torvalds considered the changes small and harmless enough to integrate them into the main development branch, even though the merge window was closed more than a week ago.

After the version jump to 3.0, the developers have also made various changes to fix some problems with two-figure version numbers. In a subsequent discussion, Torvalds indicated that he might still call the next kernel "3.0.0" should the developers be unable to find some tricks to allow older programs to handle "3.0"; among the components that are struggling with such version numbers are older versions of the module-init tools (depmod and the like), mdadm, and the LVM2 and Device Mapper tools. In the long run, however, Torvalds' plan seems to be to switch to two-figure version numbers. In another discussion Torvalds has stated that developers should normally make no assumptions about the structure of the version number.

Just before the release of RC3, Rafael J. Wysocki released new regression reports. These reports state that last weekend the main development branch contained seven bugs that didn't exist in Linux 2.6.39; a further 18 bugs are known that didn't exist in 2.6.38.

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