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Essential Mac OS X Features Ubuntu Should Have

Filed under
Mac
Ubuntu

As always, Mac OS’s new version was released to a huge hypnotized crowd that applauded and cheered as each slide was revealed. Apple claims that OS X Lion has over 250 new features; however, only a handful of them are truly Wow!-worthy. If you’ve been a long-time Ubuntu-user, you must have noticed how inspired it is from Mac OS X. Well, if we’ve got a similar UI, then why not have some common features? After all, Unity derives heavily from Windows 7 and Mac, so it won’t be a big deal if some of the cool Lion features were added to Ubuntu. Here are some essential Mac OS Lion features that deserve to be added to Ubuntu.

Better File Sharing:

Lion made file sharing a lot easier when they announced their Dropbox-style feature that allows hassle-free sharing of files between 2 computers in the same network. File sharing on Linux isn’t something that new users will get accustomed to right away. Ubuntu can take cue from Mac OS Lion or even Windows 7 and start making networking as easy as possible for neophytes. If Ubuntu wants to go for originality over inspiration, it can create a Unity launcher or lens wherein you could drag and drop your files and share them with your friends. Alternatively, an indicator applet for the same can also be a good idea.

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