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Building a Legacy

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OS
Hardware

The IBM i platform and its bigger brother, the System z mainframe, take a lot of guff for being a legacy platform. But guess what? Solaris is turning 30 next year, as is HP-UX the year after that. AIX will be 25 this year, Windows server variants are almost 20 years old (remember Windows for Workgroups 3.1?), and Linux pretty much freeze-dried after a hectic 20 years of development. OS/400, of course, just turned 23 last week, but has deeper roots back into CPFon the System/38 in 1978 and SSP on the System/36 in 1983. They are all legacy environments as far as I am concerned.

And that is one of the things that IBM and its Power Systems-IBM i partners should be emphasizing. Perhaps time-tested, stable, well-understood, and predictable are better words to describe what gets slammed as a legacy platform. It's the truth of the matter and something that drives the executives in charge of Intel's Data Center Group, which makes Xeon and Atom server processors and chipsets, to distraction. In Intel's mind, with over 96 percent of server chip shipments, it should have all of the revenues, too. Ah, but the world doesn't work that way, as Intel itself showed at its Investor Day briefings in May:

rest here




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