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Security of GNU/Linux Systems

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Linux
Security

I was surprised to see Brazil in the list of systems compromised by “Anonymous” recently. To demonstrate the compromise, /etc/passwd from some systems was published. GNU/Linux has a simple and reliable system of authentication which should prevent access to that file except by root, the administrative user. The actual passwords are not revealed but the usernames and real names of accounts are in there as well as user and group id numbers and /home directories.

A clue to the nature of the compromise comes from others in the list, Zimbabwe, Anguilla, Mosmon Council in Australia,… The latter included MySQL database dumps from “teens.mosmanlibraryblogs.com” and other sites.

rest here




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