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How not to upgrade a Mint installation

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Linux

There are community instructions on how to upgrade a Mint box in place, rather than doing a fresh install. Basically what it amounts to is: edit your sources.list to use the next generation’s monikers (for example, change all the instances of Maverick to Natty, and all instances of Julia to Katya). Then do apt-get update, and then apt-get dist-upgrade, then apt-get upgrade, then reboot.

Simple, right?

Don’t do it. It doesn’t work. At least, it didn’t work for me trying to move from Mint 10 to Mint 11 on a testing machine. I got failures trying to configure the new kernel. The resulting machine still booted, but I had no compositing and no apparent way to get it. I didn’t really care that it didn’t work, because I was just doing it to test anyway.

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