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7 Most Notorious Computer Hacker Groups of All Time

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Security

With the recent attack on PlayStation Network and a bunch of high-profile websites, computer hackers are back in the limelight again. Hackers and hacker groups were quite famous in the 80’s and 90’s but their popularity started fading since the Y2K days. Today, we are once again witnessing hackers threatening to take on giant corporations sending chills down everyone's spine.

We have already featured here some of the most infamous black hat hackers of all time. This time, we will take a quick look at some of the most notorious computer hacker groups that ever existed:

Masters of Deception

This New York-based group was responsible for notorious acts such as downloading confidential credit card histories of stars like Julia Roberts, breaking into AT&T’s computer system and stealing credit card numbers. Founded by hackers Acid Phreak, Scorpion and HAC, Masters of Deception or MOD, was a mockery of LOD (Legion of Doom), its archrival and a hugely popular hacker group at that time.

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