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Visualizing Linux Performance Data In New Ways

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One of the items I've been working on recently for Phoronix Test Suite 3.4-Lillesand is new ways to visualize performance result data generated by the many test profiles and suites available via OpenBenchmarking.org. Here's one of the new ways that was committed over the weekend to the Lillesand Git code-base.

With the 120+ test profiles and 50+ test suites available to Phoronix Test Suite users by default, generating lots of data isn't an issue. There's benchmarks constantly being carried out by the Phoronix Test Suite either publicly and then uploaded to OpenBenchmarking.org or by many parties behind their firewalls.

The problem in generating so much performance data is then analyzing and making use of the results. If you have a result file with easily dozens of different data sets, it can be a bit difficult.

rest here




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