Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The OS Mess: 5 Ways To Take Control

Filed under
OS

The help desk must be a miserable place to work these days. According to our InformationWeek Analytics OS Wars Survey, nearly every company supports Windows, half of those polled officially support Apple devices, and three in 10 support Linux or Android operating systems. Two-thirds of companies let employees connect their personal gadgets to the network with little or no guidance as to what devices and operating systems they can use or whether IT's supposed to help them. If anything goes wrong, you know who gets the call.

Welcome to the OS mess.

Windows still dominates, showing up in 99% of responses, but that dominance masks a huge change in the number of operating systems IT is dealing with. Eighty-five percent of IT organizations officially support more than one OS; the average company supports three different ones. Smartphones are a major force, ushering in Apple's iOS and the Linux-based Android on a large scale. But our research shows broadening OS support across all hardware platforms, including servers, desktops, laptops, tablets, thin clients, and smartphones.

And that's just the official count.




More in Tux Machines

New Cyber Threat Detection Tool Made Open Source

Lockheed’s move points to the power of open source, particularly when it comes to big overreaching issues such as cybersecurity. Rather than Lockheed keeping their tool as internal proprietary software and requiring others to license or purchase it, they recognized the potential their innovation holds for the greater good. This represents a huge step for both the open source and cybersecurity communities. Read more

Five Ways Open Source Databases Are Limited

Two of the reasons to deploy an open source database are cost and philosophy. Philosophically, the open source movement subscribes to the notion that having community-developed product creates a better product, and/or “contributes to the world in a better way.” The other reason is cost, which usually means “free,” or at least no-charge for the software database license. Read more

Google Chrome Turns Seven, Advances with Security and Performance Gains

After seven years of development, Google continues its rapid pace of release and enhancement for its Chrome browser. On the seventh anniversary of the first Chrome public release on September 2, Google released Chrome stable version 45 and Chrome beta 46. Google Chrome debuted on September 2, 2008 after months of speculation about Google's intentions regarding entering the browser market. The first Chrome browser entered the market at a time when Microsoft's IE still dominated, though Firefox was making a dent in that market share. Today, according to multiple sets of stats, including Statcounter, Google Chrome stands as the world's most popular web browser. Read more

The Linux Test Project has been released for September 2015

Good news everyone, the Linux Test Project test suite stable release for *September 2015* has been released. Since the last release 272 patches by 27 authors were merged. Notable changes are: * Network namespace testcases were rewritten from scratch * New user namespaces testcases * New testcases for various virtual network interfaces * New umount2() testcases (for UMOUNT_NOFOLLOW, MNT_EXPIRE and MNT_DETACH flags) * New open() testcase (for O_PATH flag) * New getrandom() testcases * New inotify, cpuset, futex_wake() and recvmsg() regression tests + The usual number of fixes and enhancements Read more