Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

MandrivaOne - a livecd

Filed under

The release of Mandriva Linux One 2006 Beta 2 was announced yesterday. As we didn't have too much luck with the first one and early reports state the boot problems still exist, Tuxmachines almost took a pass on this release. That would have been a mistake. This beta 2 shows the kind of release we've come to expect from Mandriva, even in the beta stage, and we are proud to report we had wonderful results this time.

The improvements showed immediately here. Despite other reports of the livecd still not wanting to boot with more than one cdrom drive attached, we did not experience that here. It could be several factors for this anomoly, but I have a dvd burner as hdc and a cdrw as hdd. I burnt my copy in hdd and booted in same. This drive is an LG, btw (for the reader who was concerned), and it's still with us. We had no problems. I was actually surprized and already had plans to unplug one or the other. It wasn't necessary.

I did still see a lot of boot errors, but most was due to it trying to load a lot of modules either not present on the livecd or needed here. One that raised an eyebrow or two here stated it could not find / in /etc/fstab. I adjusted my dress-shields, bit my lip and continued to watch. It booted fine, and relatively fast, but dropped me into a 800x600 desktop. Yikes. This isn't so uncommon really and certainly not the end of the world, as nv commonly detects my crt-1 first - and incorrectly. So a simple vi /etc/xorg.conf and I was in a nice 1280x1024 Mandriva desktop.

Before that first kde login one is asked their lang, keyboard, and clock/timezone settings. This is a nice touch and offered reassurance that we were dealing with a professional grade livecd. Although, for some reason, it didn't adjust my clock to proper time. I double-checked that my hardware clock was correct and it was. Again, a small and easy adjustment.

This time we found almost 100% of the applications usuable. Only a couple of the advanced mixers gave us any real problem in opening. The kscd did not want to play my music cds despite my trying to adjust the configuration. Kdetv did not work properly for me either, but it never does even with the proper kernel module parameters. Kradio and qtradio was included and worked wonderfully. As stated before, few distros in livecd format or limited in space include a radio application and that was certainly appreciated here. Some of the applications took a while to open up, but not a bad showing for a livecd. OOo took 40 seconds to open and Firefox to 11 seconds. My usb scanner was autodetected and worked out of the box in Kooka, but xsane didn't see it. Kaffine complained about windows codecs and dvd decryption, but mpgs and avis played fine. My biggest complaint was the exclusion of a compiler, but I suppose one could install it through urpmi or the graphical software manager after the hard drive install.



The harddrive installer worked wonderfully. At first use it appears simple and lacking in options. One is asked their target partition(s) and boot loader information and off it goes. It took less than 15 minutes from start to finish to install Mandriva One onto my harddrive. It does overwrite your current bootloader configuration with no way to skip that step. Although one is given ample opportunity to add all the other entries (systems) to their configuration per that usual Mandriva installer step, that's too much trouble for me. I'd rather do it manually later.


Upon boot of the hard drive install, one finds most if not all of the booting errors encountered with the livecd are gone and one is comforted by a long lists of green OK's. Before reaching the login, one is given the chance to setup their net connection, root password, and user account. Then one can login. My configuration customizations were copied over as were any userfiles I had in the guest account on the livecd. I thought that is a nice touch. Only a few livecd installs bother with that step as well.

In conclusion, good show Mandriva. Beta 1 should have been kept under-wraps and only tested internally. One rarely gets a second chance to make a first impression, but sometimes second impressions are so impressive that one almost forgets the first. This is the case with Mandriva One 2006 Livecd.

Release Announcement.
Full Rpmlist.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: KDE

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

  • What to expect from PentahoWorld 2015
    This time last year the Computer Weekly Open Source Insider blog reported on the inaugural PentahoWorld 2014 conference and exhibition.
  • Day 1 of PyCon India 2015
    Day one is the first day of main event. I was late to wake up, but somehow managed to reach the venue around 8:30am. Had a quick breakfast, and then moved into the Red Hat booth. Sankarshan, Alfred, Soni were already there. I don’t know the exact reason, but the booth managed to grab the attention of all the people in the venue. It was over crowded :) While the students were much more interested in stickers, and other goodies, many came forward to ask about internship options, and future job opportunities. Alfred did an excellent job in explaining the details to the participants. The crowd was in booth even though the keynote of day one had started. I missed most of keynote as many people kept coming in the booth, and they had various questions.
  • Windows 10: Microsoft's new browser is a FAILURE - find out why
    Microsoft tried to move users from its infamous Internet Explorer browser to a minimalist new web browser dubbed Edge following the launch of Windows 10. But new data has revealed that Windows 10 users are reluctant to make the transition.
  • Google open source project aims to speed up web
  • Google Seeks to Speed Up Mobile Web Browsing
    Google has announced a new project that could make a difference for mobile browsing. The company has launched the Accelerated Mobile Pages project (AMP), a fully open source initiative, with the underlying code available on GitHub.
  • Google wants to speed up the mobile web with AMP project
    Google has a plan to speed up mobile Web browsing. The recently unveiled AMP—Accelerated Mobile Pages—project is an open source initiative that restricts certain elements of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to produce leaner Web pages "that are optimised to load instantly on mobile devices." How much quicker is "instantly"? According to Google, early testing with with a simulated 3G connection and a simulated Nexus 5 showed improvements of between 15 to 85 percent.
  • What's New This October in Open Source CMS
    A little love, please, for Miami-based dotCMS, maker of Java open source content management system (CMS) software. Just yesterday, it was chosen as one of the 20 Most Promising Open Source Software Solution Providers by CIO Review.
  • Deweloperzy NetBSD-7.0: Leonardo Taccari
    In the series of questions and answers from the NetBSD-7.0 developers, we will meet Leoardo Taccari, a recent NetBSD committer, who works with this system on his desktop and maintains in this field pkgsrc packages.
  • NetBSD 7.0 Operating System Brings Raspberry Pi 2 and Multiprocessor ARM Support
    The developers of the open source, BSD-based NetBSD operating system have had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability of the project's fifteenth major release.
  • New Version Of JPEG-Turbo Quietly Released
    While the Internet has been buzzing recently about the new FLIF image format, libjpeg-turbo developers released a new version of their JPEG library. Libjpeg-turbo 1.4.2 is the new release and it quietly made it out at the end of September. Libjpeg-Turbo 1.4.2 features at least five known bug fixes resulting in crashes and other problems.
  • Open data Incubator: ODINE selected its first round of start-ups
    Seven start-ups from UK, Italy, France, Estonia and Austria were selected to be part of the first round of companies benefiting from the Open Data Incubator for Europe (ODINE). This two-year programme awarded EUR 650 000 in total to the companies, which can receive up to EUR 100 000 each.
  • Eleven Open Source 3D Printer Hits Kickstarter (video)
    ISG3D has taken to Kickstarter this month to raise $11,000 to help take their open source 3D printer design into production. The Eleven 3D printer has been specifically designed to provide users with an affordable machine but offers an impressive 22 x 40 x 40 cm build area and is completely open source allowing for modifications and enhancements to be created.

Development News

  • Perl 6 is coming soon: What it will bring
    Perl 6, a long-awaited upgrade to the well-known scripting language, has gone into beta, with the general release planned for Christmastime. The upgrade went to beta late last month, Perl designer Larry Wall told InfoWorld on Wednesday, and the October monthly release will feature the first of two beta releases of the Rakudo Perl 6 compiler. There been having monthly compiler releases for years, but the language definition has now stabilized. Wall added, “At this point we're optimizing, fixing bugs, and documenting, and I feel comfortable saying we can take a snapshot of whatever we have in December and call it the first production release.”
  • PEAR 1.10 Released With PHP 7 Support
  • Couchbase Server 4.0 introduces SQL-based query language N1QL (Nickel)
    Couchbase Server 4.0 is designed to give software application development pros a route to building more apps on Couchbase.