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ASRock H61M/U3S3

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Hardware

At Phoronix we have reviewed several different motherboards under Linux since the Sandy Bridge launch with either the P67 or H67 chipsets, but in this review we are looking at one that uses the Intel H61 chipset. The particular motherboard under test is the ASRock H61M/U3S3, which was launched a few months back, but we've been waiting for the Intel Sandy Bridge open-source support under Linux to mature a bit more.

Compared to the Intel H67 chipset, the H61 is slightly trimmed down. For the most part, these two Cougar Point chipsets are quite similar, but the H61 has only six PCI Express ports versus eight with the H67, support for two DDR3 memory slots (4 on the H67), support for only ten USB ports (14 on the H67), four Serial ATA ports (6 on the H67), and lacks support for Intel Rapid Storage Technology. Besides that they are near identical in supporting the second-generation Core "Sandy Bridge" processors, the HD 3000 graphics capabilities found on the SNB CPUs, Serial ATA 3.0, and PCI Express 2.0 support. There is also the new Z68 as of May that provides the feature-set of the P67 motherboards while tacking on the integrated graphics support and Intel Smart Response Technology. A review on an ASRock Z68 motherboard will also be published in the coming days.

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