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Microsoft contributes a lot of changes to Linux kernel 3.0

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Linux
Microsoft

The 343 changes made by Microsoft developer K. Y. Srinivasan put him at the top of a list, created by LWN.net, of developers who made the most changes in the current development cycle for Linux 3.0. Along with a number of other "change sets", Microsoft provided a total of 361 changes, putting it in seventh place on the list of companies and groups that contributed code to the Linux kernel. By comparison, independent developers provided 1,085 change sets to Linux 3.0, while Red Hat provided 1,000 and Intel 839.

The figures were published on Thursday in an LWN.net article which is available exclusively to subscribers until this coming Thursday (21 July); however, bloggers have already commented on the figures.

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Microsoft

I don't know what to think about that.

There's no mystery: MS has a

There's no mystery: MS has a few customers who want to be able to deploy windows vms under linux ... then the sales dept puts pressure on IT to get it done.

More info MS Linux

zdnet.com: Cats and dogs; apples and oranges; Linux and Microsoft. Two of these three things do not go together. Would you believe that Microsoft—yes Microsoft—was the fifth largest contributor to the soon to be released Linux 3.0 kernel? Believe it.

Microsoft developer K. Y Srinivasan gets the credit for helping to improve Linux. Of course, as you might guess, neither Srinivasan nor Microsoft are doing this due to any particular love tor Linux per se.

The vast bulk of Microsoft’s contributions has been to its own Hyper-V virtualization hypervisor drivers.

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