Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Getting to know Drupal

Filed under
Drupal

You may recall that I've been working on revamping one of my Web sites with the open-source Drupal content management system (CMS). I'm finally done with the implementation and the design work and I'm well on my way into deployment, so I wanted to let you know that Drupal has ended up working extremely well for me.

It didn't start that way! First, I found that Ubuntu and Drupal were, for me anyway, not a good fit.

I then moved on to deploying a test system on SUSE 10. This went better, but along the way I found that Drupal was a bit cranky. The long and short of is that you need to make sure you have just the right versions of MySQL, PHP, and Apache lined up correctly for your version of Drupal, or you're likely to run into trouble.

With that done, though, I was quickly able to build the framework of my Web site and run up my test system structure. In case you haven't done this kind of thing before, always, always build a test site instead of tinkering with your site on the Web.

Now, I was finally seeing the promise I'd seen earlier when I decided to use Drupal. Its excellent taxonomy system made it simple to use both hierarchical classification and term synonmyns. In English, this means I can classify documents so that they're easy to find.

For example, as I enter stories about SCO's legal fights, its OpenServer operating system, or how Caldera and the Santa Cruz Operation became SCO, I simply classify them with the taxonomy term: "SCO." Now, whenever anyone wants to see what I've written about SCO, they can just pick that term from the menu or any story about SCO, and, ta-da, a listing of the SCO stories appears.

I don't need to organize them, I don't need to set up a directory for them. I don't need to do anything. Now, some of you might be thinking, "couldn't I just Google them up?" Well, yes and no. With a search engine, you'd also get the stores that simply mention SCO in passing.

With this system, I also don't have to work on creating a separate table of contents. My taxonomy automatically becomes my menu system.

Of course, this is overkill for a simple blog, but for a complex site with many articles, it's exactly what you want.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

The Machine with Open Source Carbon OS is the Next Big Thing – if HP can deliver

HP has recently been facing some serious difficulties and has opted to betting all its resources on the new PC called ‘The Machine’. Probably the most intriguing thing about the machine is that it will rewrite basic computing on a very fundamental level. While the topic has been covered extensively, I realized we haven’t actually touched it here and thought it was about time. Read more

YEAR of the PENGUIN: A Linux mobile in 2015?

It's nearly impossible to sum up an entire year of developments in something as large and nebulous as the world of desktop Linux, especially in a year like this one which has seen some the best releases that projects like Mint, Fedora and openSUSE have put out to date. At the same time the distro that's closest to being a household name, Ubuntu, has been nearly silent since 14.04 arrived in April. To paraphrase author Charles Dickens, the past year of Linux releases has been both the best of times and the worst of times. At the very moment that Linux desktops seem to be reaching new levels of sophistication, polish and "just works" ease-of-use, the entire future of the desktop computer (by which I also mean laptop) feels in doubt. Read more

Jolla's Sailfish OS Update 10 Is Now Available

The tenth update to Jolla's Sailfish mobile operating system is now available. This update is version 1.1.1.26 and is codenamed Vaarainjärvi. Read more

Forget Google's robot cars, now it's on to ANDROID cars

Google is planning a big push into in-car infotainment systems with an upcoming version of Android, sources claim. "Android M" – the version to come after the current Android 5.0 "Lollipop" – will be available in a formulation designed specifically to run cars' built-in screens, Reuters reports, citing anonymous insiders with knowledge of the plan. Google made its first advances toward the automotive world at its I/O developer conference earlier this year, when it unveiled its Android Auto software. The first Android Auto–compatible cars are expected to arrive early next year. Read more