Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

After four months home confinement, reporter has no regrets

Filed under
Legal

The boredom was worse than reporter Jim Taricani expected during his four month home confinement sentence for protecting a source. Too much TV watching, house cleaning and reading left him looking for ways to kill time, and appreciating the freedom he'd taken for granted.

''It was certainly much better than prison,'' he said. ''But it gets to you after a while. When you lose your freedom, it's a big deal.''

On Saturday, Taricani's ankle bracelet was broken off, he bid his probation officer good bye and he planned a trip to New York City to enjoy museums, shopping and time outside with his wife. Though his confinement was tougher than anticipated, Taricani, 55, said he doesn't regret his decision to stay quiet about who gave him an FBI surveillance video that exposed government corruption.

''We had a real good reason to inform the public of what public corruption really looked like,'' Taricani told The Associated Press. ''Rarely do they see a high ranking public official taking a $1,000 cash bribe on video.''

Taricani broke no law by airing in 2001 the secret FBI tape, which was part of an investigation that ultimately sent former Providence Mayor Vincent ''Buddy'' Cianci and other officials to prison. The newsman was sentenced in December after being found in criminal contempt for refusing to give up his source.

Taricani completed his home confinement Saturday, two months earlier than his original release date. He was granted early release after a federal judge found that he had complied with all the conditions of the home confinement, which included a ban on working, giving media interviews or using the Internet.

He described the experiences as psychologically draining.

''You're just not free,'' he said. ''You have an ankle bracelet on, you're monitored, your probation officer shows up unannounced. It's taxing.''

During the four months, Taricani read books and newspapers, watched cable news, cleaned his house and worked on a mystery novel he had started over the summer.

''I found myself just doing things to make the time go by,'' he said.
Taricani, who works for the NBC affiliate WJAR-TV, was given home confinement because of his health: he had a heart transplant in 1996 and takes medication daily to prevent organ rejection.

Taricani is one of several journalists nationwide who have become locked in First Amendment battles with the government over confidential sources. Reporters for Time and The New York Times have recently been threatened with jail as part of an investigation into the disclosure of an undercover CIA officer's identity.

Taricani said he expects to go back to work on Wednesday.

After Taricani was convicted, Providence defense attorney Joseph Bevilacqua Jr. came forward and admitted he leaked the tape.

When he sentenced Taricani in December, U.S. District Judge Ernest Torres said the newsman had no First Amendment right to protect a source who broke the law by providing him with information. Attorneys, investigators and defendants were under court order not to release any tapes connected to the City Hall corruption probe, and a special prosecutor had been appointed to find out who leaked the tape.

Taricani said Saturday that he'd promised to protect his source's identity and was acting on principle.

''If reporters can't have the opportunity to use confidential sources when they need to, we no longer have a free press,'' he said.

Bevilacqua told prosecutors that he never required Taricani to withhold his identity, and said he signed a waiver of confidentiality.

But Taricani said Bevilacqua insisted that his identity be kept confidential, and suggested the waiver was forced.

''I knew that he was in a position where he had to do that otherwise he would've been highly suspect,'' Taricani said. ''I knew as soon as I saw it that he had no intention of really wanting me to give his name up.''

Prosecutors have not decided whether to criminally charge Bevilacqua for leaking the tape.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

Programming: nGraph Compiler, JavaScript Trademark, PyPI and Pip

  • Intel Opens Up nGraph Source Code For DNN Model Compiler
    Intel tonight announced they are open-sourcing their nGraph compiler code, which serves as a framework-neutral deep neural network model compiler. Intel claims with nGraph and Xeon Scalable hardware that researchers can obtain up to 10x performance improvements over previous TensorFlow integrations, as one example. Besides TensorFlow, nGraph also supports PyTorch, MXNet, Neon, Caffe2, and CNTK while also planning to support other frameworks moving forward.
  • Why it's finally time to give up on the name JavaScript
    An iOS developer has apparently received a cease and desist notice from Oracle over the use of the word "JavaScript" in the title of their app. The developer, Tyanya Software, shared the notice on perennial internet soapbox Reddit to seek advice on how to fight the order. [...] If user reviews are any indication, the app is not even particularly good, with reviewers stating things such as "Not ready for production," "Does not work as advertised," and "Waste of money, don't buy this." The last update to the app was in 2014, which the changelog notes was only an upgrade to add support for iOS 8. The app developer is at least honest about the intent behind the unwieldy name for the app, saying in a Reddit comment that "we game the App Store ranking by adding all the keywords to the app name." While Oracle has a duty to protect their trademarks, this type of legal bludgeoning underscores a historical problem that has been left unaddressed for too long: JavaScript is a terrible name for the thing being described. It has nothing to do with Java, an actual product developed by Sun (now owned by Oracle). JavaScript was developed at Mozilla, and the name was changed during beta releases of Netscape Navigator 2.0 from "LiveScript" to "JavaScript." It has, for some time, caused confusion among casual web users about the difference between Java and JavaScript. Given that ECMAScript is also a trademarked term, it seems best to revert to calling the language "LiveScript" to undercut trademark-related legal posturing. [...] Oracle declined to comment on this story.
  • New PyPI launched
    The new PyPI has been launched. Browser traffic and API calls (including "pip install") have been redirected from the old pypi.python.org to the new site. The old PyPI will shut down on April 30. LWN covered the new PyPI last week.
  • Pip 10.0 has been released
    The release of pip 10.0 has been announced. Some highlights of this release include the removal of Python 2.6 support, limited PEP 518 support (with more to come), a new "pip config" command, and other improvements.

Meltdown/PTI Mitigation Impact On BSDs vs. Linux

Besides the fresh BSD/Linux disk performance tests, some other tests I ran on various BSDs and Linux distributions this week was looking at the performance impact of Intel Meltdown CPU vulnerability mitigation on each of them, namely the performance impact of using kernel page-table isolation. On DragonFlyBSD 5.2, TrueOS 18.03, Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, and Clear Linux I ran tests when the mitigation was enabled and then again when it was off for seeing the performance impact. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

  • Enterprise Node.js on OpenShift, April 19th, 12 p.m. EDT
    The next online DevNation Live Tech Talk is Thursday, April 19th at 12pm EDT. The topic is “Enterprise Node.js on Red Hat OpenShift” presented by Lance Ball, and hosted by Burr Sutter. The popularity of JavaScript on the front end and the JSON format for data has led to a “JavaScript Everywhere” movement with Node.js at the center. Node.js offers developers an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that is perfect for high concurrency, low-latency applications that run across distributed devices. Its reactive architecture makes it an ideal technology for containerized microservices architectures you’ve been hearing so much about.
  • President to President with Luc Villeneuve, Red Hat Canada
    ITWC President Fawn Annan gets to the point with Red Hat’s general manager for Canada. Villeneuve speaks about building the open source technology firm in the country, the unique differences when dealing with the Quebec market, and how he fosters a positive culture in the workplace. Plus, he dishes on how his experience in journey hockey taught him how to build a successful sales team.
  • Be mindful of jumping into an open source project too soon: RedHat CTO
    Open source software has long been seen as a movement towards collaborative development. In a conversation with BusinessLine, Chris Wright, Vice-President & CTO at RedHat, talks about some of the challenges the open source community is facing and why it is important to set expectations right when it comes to promoting open source software. Edited excerpts:
  • DevOps Tool Market Global Manufacturers: Chef, Atlassian, Saltstac, Red Hat and Docker Inc.
  • Two sizzlers stock’s are not to be missed: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Navient Corporation (NAVI)
  • Fedora Community Blog: Fedora meetup at Pune – March 2018
    Long time we did not had any meetup at Pune, Maharashtra, India, so we decided to get started again. Details about this meetup are available at Fedora Wiki page. Planning for meetup started 1 month before. Initially Ompragash proposed to have meetup.com account for Fedora Pune to get more awareness. Later dropped this plan, since this is not only Fedora Pune level topic but applicable for all Fedora events.
  • Fedora 28 Beta – dnf system-upgrade
    Used DNF to remove duplicate rpms, reinstalled the new kernel and libwbclient, and corrected GNOME’s right-click behaviour, and all is well.

Security Leftovers