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Microsoft says Open Office.org 10 years behind

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Software

As general manager, business strategy, for the Information Worker Group at Microsoft Corporation, Alan Yates develops and guides new business initiatives for the Office products group at Redmond. While we await the release of Microsoft Office 2007, promised to hit our shelves before the end of 2006, Yates dismisses open source rival Open Office.org 2.0 as being 10 years out of date.

According to Yates, there are very good reasons for people to pay $500 or more for even the soon to be superseded version of Microsoft Office as opposed to paying nothing for a copy of Open Office 2.0, which the Linux crowd will tell you does the job just as well.

"It really depends upon what job you're trying to do. Certainly, if you're just trying to write a few notes or something, Open Office is just fine. The truth is though that Open Office.org is really designed to solve the problems that Microsoft focussed on 10 years ago when the model was an individual user working at their individual PC," says Yates.

Full Story.

They're joking, right?

So M$ Office Word outputs to PDF, does it? And you can link Text Boxes together to flow articles magazine style, can you?

Oh and Text/Graphics Frames in M$ Office NEVER go flying off to another page when another box competes for their space, do they?

In truth, they are quite even, with OOo ahead on the word processor and M$ office a little ahead on the Spreadsheet. And those are the things that most people use.

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