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Governance and scarcity.

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Linux
Web

Most of the time that we see contentious debate come up in the Fedora Project is when the community is trying to create, or agree on, the governance or process by which a scarce resource is used or allocated.

Recall the friction a year or two ago regarding how to advertise different spins of Fedora on the website, and whether or not the layout would recommend a default spin, or promote one spin as a first-among-equals. Real estate on the front page of fedoraproject.org is a scarce resource, which leads to lots of people debating the most efficient way to allocate it.

One of the key responsibilities of Fedora’s leadership is to identify these scarcity points and understand them. It is the job of Fedora’s leaders to understand whether the scarcity in question is real or artificial.

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