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Five things I dislike about SUSE 10

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I've been running the retail version on SUSE Linux 10.0 as my production desktop machine since early November. I like its online update facility; it's a great way to keep the system refreshed with the latest security and bug fixes, and I'm not the only one who feels this way. But I've found a few things in SUSE 10 that I'm not too fond of, and that make me start thinking about changing distros.

I'm not talking about the community version, openSUSE 10, which is supported by Novell and available for free download. This is the boxed set of CDs (or DVD) available for purchase from Novell for $60.

Mind you, the retail version is no different from its community cousin. But you do get a book and five CDs, even a DVD if you prefer. What you don't get, but which I assumed incorrectly that you did, is any extra testing, spit and polish, or better integration of the whole. I didn't appreciate finding this out the hard way, instead of knowing it up front.

The open version of SUSE is touted as making all the latest stuff available earlier than you can get it in the commercial version, with perhaps a few bumps in the road as a result, for hobbyists and aficionados to play with and test and help debug the latest application releases before they get rolled up into the professional edition. It turns out the retail version has exactly the same set of bumps in the road as the open version.

Full Story.

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