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Firefox 7 Might Use 50 to 75 Percent More Memory

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Moz/FF

In a statement released today, the Mozilla Foundation announced that for all future versions of Firefox, starting with version 7 which is still under development, reducing memory leaks will no longer be a priority – not at all, actually.

Gary Kovacs, CEO of Mozilla Corporation, said in a press conference that Mozilla sensed that developers were getting very tired of the endless whining about memory usage of the popular browser and its many plugins.

“We don’t want to annoy people, and certainly not the developers who contribute so much to Firefox. In a time where everyone can have 4 GB of RAM, a browser slowly eating up a gigabyte or more shouldn’t be a problem. And if it crashes, it takes just a minute to start up again, so there’s really no point to be so uptight about it”, Kovavs said, while handing out baskets with complimentary memory modules.

rest here




Is this article supposed to

Is this article supposed to be funny? That is a rhetorical question by the way.

Firefox

So Mozilla pretty much has a death wish eh?

Oops, nevermind - it's a "humorous" news article and not based on real statements from Mozilla.

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