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Linux Mint Debian Edition(s) - Rolling and Updates

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Linux

My recent post about the Perils of Rolling Distributions seems to have ruffled some feathers. So I would like to clarify a few things, and hopefully calm things down a bit. But let me start out by saying once again, I am not anti-Mint, upset with Mint, generally upset, rabid, or in any other way cross about the current situation. I have been a Mint supporter for quite a long time, and I continue to be very much so. I am likewise not a Mint fanatic, I do not think it is the "one true Linux distribution", and I personally use several others regularly (PCLinuxOS and Mepis, for example). What I would call the current "transition" period for the Linux Mint distribution has resulted in some temporarily confusing situations, and I would like to avoid having people make negative decisions about Mint based on this. I will try one more time to clarify a bit, and if it doesn't work again... I'll go sit quietly in the corner and mutter to myself.

The Linux Mint Debian Edition distributions (Gnome and Xfce) are based on the Debian "testing" branch, rather than on Ubuntu. This means that updates are made to it much more quickly, which has the obvious advantage of speedy distribution, but the disadvantage of somewhat less stability.

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