Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

22 Greatest Graphics Cards Of All Time

Filed under
Hardware

Meet The Most Legendary Graphics Cards

We thought it would be fun to walk down memory lane and recount the most powerful GPUs. We'll start back in 1996 with a single pixel pipeline and make our way to the present day with modern monsters capable of handling over 3000 pixel shader operations per clock!

1. March 1996: 3dfx Voodoo1

The first accomplished accelerator was 3dfx's original Voodoo. With a 50 MHz core/memory clock and 4 MB of RAM, this 3D-only product needed to be used in tandem with a 2D graphics card, as it was incapable of running Windows on its own. Despite that disadvantage, it delivered 3D frame rates superior to every other product on the market, easily beating the S3 Virge, ATI Rage II, and Rendition Verite 1000 chipsets.

2. Late 1997: Nvidia Riva 128

After more than a year of undisputed supremacy, 3dfx was finally usurped by an upstart company called Nvidia and its new Riva 128 3D accelerator. With a 100 MHz core/memory clock and 4 MB of SGRAM, the Riva 128 was probably the first real competition for the Voodoo chipset.

Rest Here




More in Tux Machines

OnePlus 5T review—An outstanding combination of specs, design, and price

After launching the OnePlus 5 earlier this year, OnePlus is back with an end-of-year upgrade for the device. The OnePlus 5T takes a winning formula—high-end specs with a low price tag and a metal body—and reworks the front of the phone to dedicate as much space as possible to the screen. This device has a new screen, a new button layout, a new fingerprint reader, and a new camera setup. It almost feels like a totally new device. We liked the OnePlus 5 from earlier in the year, but, with the more modern design, OnePlus has fixed OnePlus 5's biggest downside. The result is something that is extremely compelling—a $500 phone that makes you question exactly why you'd give $800 to those other OEMs when this has nearly everything the more expensive phones have. Read more

Linus Torvalds: 'I don't trust security people to do sane things'

Linus Torvalds has offered his thoughts on Linux security approaches, branding some security professionals as "f*cking morons" for focusing on process-killing rather than debugging. Torvalds, the creator and principal developer of the Linux kernel, does not often pull his punches when it comes to the kernel's behaviors and security. The engineer carried on the tradition over the weekend, as Google Pixel developer Kees Cook submitted a pull request for hardened usercopy changes for v4.15-rc1, which according to Cook, narrows areas of memory "that can be copied to/from userspace in the face of usercopy bugs by adding explicit whitelisting for slab cache regions." Read more Also: Linux creator slams security bods

Sustainable Open Source is About Evolution as a Group

The role of a CMO in a software company is fundamentally different from that in any other category. We have a really interesting role in marketing and technology, and it’s one of education and guidance. There used to be a place 20 years ago where, as a marketer, you would come up with a simple pithy message and buy a bunch of advertising and people would believe it. That’s not true anymore. Now we have to position ourselves alongside the architectures and the thought leadership that our customers are interested in to prove our value. Read more

Games: SuperTuxKart, PAWARUMI, Radar Warfare and More