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Installing Linux on old PC’s

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Linux

In part one I showed you that you could install a linux distro on a new computer and transplant it into a 386 computer in a short amount of time and with little effort. Now it is time to move on to bigger and beefier machines like 486′s, Pentiums and better.

Less than 16 megs of ram:

This is where my second laptop comes in. It is an old first run Pentium running at 90Mhz with 8 megs of ram. On machines with <16 megs of ram there is not much choice out there.

Much like the 386 install, you can use an older distribution, but you do have a couple of other options. One is DSL linux, which is no longer being supported outside of its community. Another is Deli linux, which is also not supported anymore, but has a fork called DeLicate. Since DeLicate does not have an installer, you need to install DeLicate 8 first and then upgrade through the package manager.

rest here




Bah

I once dipped a old firebrick into some gold paint, but it was still just a old brick.

What a waste of time and effort.

Landfill those dinosaurs and waste your time on a 5 year old computer.

Or better yet, pry open your wallet and spend a few hundred bucks and get something built this year.

Humbug

vonskippy, do you like ANYTHING?

I mean, seriously. Is there anything in the world, anything at all, that you like and approve of? Anything at all. One single thing would do it.

yes, he does...

... and you've supplied it!

Oh come on.

Oh come on, do you or anyone else really think it's worthy of anyone's time to waste on these dinosaurs?. Most modern watches/smartphones/PDA's/Tablets/Netbooks have way way way way way more functionality while using way way way way way way less electricity.

Sure, if you like to restore ancient history, that's great, but as any practical exercise in modern computing it's a waste of time and effort. The distro choices that will work on just old tech is so far out of date, out of security, and out of any useful function it's a complete waste of time. At least the people who get Linux running on a toaster are doing something clever - these guys are just repeating 20 year old history (look at me, I've rotated the tires on my 78 Nova), nothing new, nothing clever, nothing noteworthy.

I love how blogs/forums have gone from a method of communicating OPINIONS into the childish "you either agree 110% with me, or you're wrong".

I post my OPINIONS. Agree, disagree, I don't care, but if you have no other form of rebuttal then attacking me the writer, instead of my opinions, you're the troll, not I.

grumpy

dwasifar wrote:
vonskippy, do you like ANYTHING?

I mean, seriously. Is there anything in the world, anything at all, that you like and approve of? Anything at all. One single thing would do it.

Attention. He is a lonely soul and this is his only enjoyment so please be kind to the grumpy old man.

Thank U.

Troll?

Never accused you of trolling. I also never even said whether I disagreed with you about this article; you assumed that.

This is not about this particular response to this particular article. It's about your comments in general. I've been coming here for a long time, and I have never, ever seen you post anything remotely positive. Perhaps you have, and I've just happened to miss it. But overwhelmingly, the comments I see from you are snide cutdowns of whatever the subject happens to be. So the question - do you like ANYTHING? - is a fair one. Or, if you would prefer it in the terms you used: do you have a positive OPINION of anything? Anything at all? One single thing would do it.

Never accused you

You can accuse me of trolling. heh heh

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