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What GNOME Can Learn from KDE's Recovery

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KDE
Software

When users complain about GNOME 3, inevitably they compare its release to KDE 4.0's. One KDE developer has told me that he dislikes the comparison, but, in the absence of other parallels, it continues to be made.

However, one part of the analogy that hasn't been explored is KDE's recovery from its user revolt, and whether GNOME is in any position to emulate that as well.

KDE's recovery has not received much notice. It hasn't been covered by the free software media. Often, too, it is overshadowed by those still loyal to the KDE 3 series, who continue to express their dissatisfaction at every opportunity.

All the same, KDE's recovery is as remarkable in its way as the meltdown over the 4.0 release. So is there any chance that GNOME could make a similar recovery?

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