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The Linux Setup - Dusty Phillips, Developer

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Linux
Software
Interviews

Dusty Phillips certainly falls into the power user category and his answers reflect that status. Dusty runs a tight system that’s optimized for his workflow. And it’s fascinating that he does so much with just one machine.

1. Who are you, and what do you do?

I am Dusty Phillips, and I wear many hats. Professionally, I am a Canadian freelance software developer who works primarily with Python. Lately, I’ve done a lot of Django work, but I wouldn’t typecast myself as a Django developer.
I’m the author of the book Python 3 Object Oriented Programming. I expect to be writing another book soon, and I also spend a fair bit of time editing and proofreading.

In the open source world, I have held too many positions within the Arch Linux community to count. I think these days, I’m most known as the maintainer of the Arch Linux Schwag store.

2. What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

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