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Top 5 PDF Readers for Linux

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Software

Portable Document Format or PDF is the most widely used format for sending and receiving documents these days. Being an open standard for document exchange, PDF support has been incorporated in many Linux distributions by default. Also, the popularity of the format has even convinced Microsoft to include PDF support in the upcoming version of Windows.

Earlier, many people had to rely on the closed-source Adobe PDF reader for accessing PDF documents. However, thanks to the hard work of many software developers, we have plenty of tools to do that.

Here’s a list of some of the best PDF readers you can find for Linux:




Oh for something better

I would like to use Evince but (incredibly) it has no text selection tool. You can select all or nothing.

Foxit always starts with a ridiculously small-sized window with the sidebar in view and no way of making it invisible by default. It also automatically copies selected text to the clipboard, sometimes before you have finished selecting the text you want to copy. That happens even though the clipboard manager is set not to allow copying by mere selection.

Adobe needs a new settings folder with each update and on random occasions thereafter, which means you have to set preferences again and again. It has trouble remembering the default folder for opening documents.

I like Okular but it only allows you to view one document at a time and unnecessarily stores (and keeps) data about any document opened in it.

I tried the small readers (excluding mupdf) but removed them for reasons I forget.

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