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LibreOffice and drift apart

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Michael Meeks, a LibreOffice developer at Novell, compared the codebase of LibreOffice with the sources hosted at the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). As he writes in a blog post, the differences are already so great that it will now be hard to exchange new code between the two projects.

In light of the several million lines of source code by which the two products now differ, he says users should not assume that code committed to Apache will "inevitably and automatically appear in LibreOffice". "Instead I suspect we will end up cherry-picking and porting only those things that justify the effort, as/when/if there is any such thing," added Meeks.

rest here

LibreOffice and Apache Software Foundation.

Thats a good take on whats happened so far. I also doubt that ASF are doing anything with the Open Office code that was dumped on them. I am only wondering how long it will take for ASF to see the light and pass that code over to LibreOffice to close the fork and give the whole world what it wants, one FOSS office standard to beat MS around the planet with. Regards me

Have a nice day

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