Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Diaspora still trying to reinvent social networks

Filed under
Software
OSS
Web

Most people won't have even heard of it. Diaspora is an up and coming social network which is getting a lot more attention in some circles in the wake of Google+'s 'real names' policy.

Users are climbing on board after being tipped off that there's a network just like Google+, only without having anything to do with Google, where you can be who you want to be, how you want to be, and still retain full ownership of everything you put there.

Currently invite-only and in alpha, preparing to roll out beta, Diaspora is an open-source social network. It's run on free software that anyone with a little bit of coding know-how can get involved in developing. The community involvement in running the site is huge. From spreading the word to community support, it's all open for volunteering.

Unlike Facebook and Google+, company-run businesses which aim to get as much data from you as they possibly can, the guys behind Diaspora take a completely different view:

rest here




Diaspora

Too little too late. The only ones that will use this service will be the Linux geeks.

re: Diaspora

Well, that wouldn't be all bad.

Another Diaspora

Social Networking has revolutionized the way we communicate in today’s fast paced world. With more and more people with constant access to the internet, nearly everyone you know has an account with popular networking sites – Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, et al. It has become a way of life today and makes for easy sharing and communication between friends and relatives.

rest here

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

OSS: IBM, Logz.io, Forbes FUD and OpenAI

Graphics: Mesa and More

Red Hat Leftovers

Kernel: CH341 and LWN Articles (Just Freed)

  • Linux Adds CH341 GPIO
    There was a time when USB to serial hardware meant one company: FTDI. But today there are quite a few to choose from and one of the most common ones is the WCH CH341. There’s been support for these chips in Linux for a while, but only for use as a communication port. The device actually has RS232, I2C, SPI, and 8 general purpose I/O (GPIO) pins. [ZooBaB] took an out-of-tree driver that exposes the GPIO, and got it working with some frightening-looking CH341 boards.
  • Shrinking the kernel with an axe
    This is the third article of a series discussing various methods of reducing the size of the Linux kernel to make it suitable for small environments. The first article provided a short rationale for this topic, and covered link-time garbage collection. The second article covered link-time optimization (LTO) and compared its results to link-time garbage collection. In this article we'll explore ways to make LTO more effective at optimizing kernel code away, as well as more assertive strategies to achieve our goal.
  • The rest of the 4.16 merge window
    At the close of the 4.16 merge window, 11,746 non-merge changesets had been merged; that is 5,000 since last week's summary. This merge window is thus a busy one, though not out of line with its predecessors — 4.14 had 11,500 changesets during its merge window, while 4.15 had 12,599. Quite a bit of that work is of the boring internal variety; over 600 of those changesets were device-tree updates, for example. But there was still a fair amount of interesting work merged in the second half of the 4.16 merge window; read on for the highlights.