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Fun and Mayhem with the Blender Game Engine

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Gaming
HowTos

I've been working with Blender 3-D for several years now, but I started playing with the game engine only recently. I've had a lot of fun with it, and I'm sure you will as well. With the Blender Game Engine (BGE), you can create 3-D games using the keyboard or mouse as controllers. Your game can trigger events when objects collide with each other or when they get within a certain distance from each other. There is a built-in state engine, so that objects in your game can change their behavior as required. Although there is a powerful and well-documented Python API, we won't be using it today. In fact, we won't be writing a single line of code!

In the April 2009 issue of Linux Journal, I wrote an article demonstrating the Irrlicht 3-D engine by creating a basic 3-D environment in less than 100 lines of C. In this article, I demonstrate the BGE by creating a functional video game, complete with realistic physics, and all I'm going to do is connect dots.

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