Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Why You Should Join Diaspora Now, Like Your Freedom Depends On It

I never really “trusted” Facebook or Google+. That is to say, I never expected them to respect my privacy or keep my secrets. I’m not too secretive online anyway, and what I do have to hide, I just don’t post. But it is very clear that there is a great deal of corruption inherent in a business model which is based on concentrating the personal data from millions of users and selling that data to advertisers. At the very least, there must be a free alternative. But for that alternative to be viable, we need to use it. Identica has been around for some time now (and I use it — I’m “digitante”), and Diaspora is (after a long hard start) finally getting some wind under its wings. I’ve used it, and it’s Good Enough. In fact, you’ll find it’s pretty similar to what Facebook or Google+ offers, although there are still some rough spots.

We’re Free Software users. We’re Free Software advocates. Theoretically at least, we care about freedom. And it’s no good whining to Google’s management about the ethical bankruptcy of demanding full identification or rejecting pseudonymous users. Nor is there much point in writing cutting editorials about Facebook’s (lack of) privacy ethics. Neither company is likely to be responsive to these complaints.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

LLVM News

  • GCC 6.2/7.0 vs. LLVM Clang 3.9/4.0 SVN Compiler Performance
    Earlier this week I published some GCC 5.4 vs. GCC 6.2 vs. GCC 7.0 SVN development benchmarks with a Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E system. For those curious how the LLVM Clang compiler stack is comparing, here are some tests on the same system when running fresh benchmarks of LLVM Clang 3.9 as well as LLVM Clang 4.0 SVN. These tests were done with LLVM Clang 3.9 and 4.0 SVN added in to the GCC results from this Core i7 6800K system running Ubuntu 16.10 with the Linux 4.8 kernel. The CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS were maintained the same throughout all testing with the "-O3 -march=native" flags.
  • LLVM 3.9.1 Expected For Release Next Week
    While LLVM 4.0 isn't coming until its planned release in Feburary, the LLVM 3.9.1 point release is expected this coming week. Tom Stellard of AMD released LLVM 3.9.1-rc3 on Friday and anticipates this being the last release candidate. This 3.9.1-rc3 build just has some ARM/AArch64 fixes compared to his earlier RC2 milestone.

Linux Graphics