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Distro review : Dragora GNU/Linux

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It's time for a review here at Linux Career and we will focus today's article on a relative newcomer : Dragora GNU/Linux. It is a Argentina-based distribution, started in 2007 by Matias A. Fonzo, a Linux enthusiast, along with just a few contributors. It is one of the few Linux distributions comprised of 100% Free/Libre Software, and endorsed by the Free Software Foundation. If you expect bells and whistles, think again : it's a distribution that focuses on simplicity, one application per task and it's aimed at people who want to learn about how a Linux system works. If this scares you, there's no need : we installed Dragora GNU/Linux 2.1 64-bit, tinkered with it, liked it, so we'll be able to get you started. Being a small community distro, at the moment Dragora GNU/Linux doesn't have much documentation online, but the manual pages are well written and if you ask on their group you will likely get an answer.

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