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Debian 6.0: LXDE Menus

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Linux
Software

Let me say up front that I like the LXDE desktop. It's clean, and more importantly, it's fast -- those applications which were sluggish under KDE 4 really zip under LXDE. So I'm willing to invest some effort to make this work.

And a good thing, too, because customizing the LXDE Start Menu is a real treasure hunt, with a shortage of clues (documentation).

When I installed LXDE from the Debian repository, it started right up, and its Start Menu had the usual default categories (Accessories, Games, Internet, Office, and so on). And most of my applications were in the correct categories. But a few were missing, such as Claws (my email client), and I wanted to create some new categories. No problem; I expect to do this with any new system.

rest here




LXDE menu is OpenBox menu

LXDE is the Display Environment, OpenBox is the Window Manager, for those searching for the answers to this problem. Check out the OpenBox menus.

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