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Chucking MeeGo: Asus Eee PC X101 tested with Windows, Ubuntu, Chromium

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The Asus Eee PC X101 is an inexpensive netbook with 1GB of RAM, an 8GB solid state disk, and a 1.33 GHz Intel Atom N435 processor. Those specs are pretty anemic compared to a typical 2010 or 2011 model netbook, but they all help keep the price low. Asus expects the X101 to sell for $199. But there’s one more thing the company has done to keep the price low: The Eee PC X101 ships with MeeGo Linux instead of Windows.

The X101 is just starting to hit the market in the US, but Riccardo Palombo at Eee PC Italia has been playing with one for a little while, and he deiced to try replacing MeeGo with a couple of different operating systems to see how it performs.

The 8GB of flash storage makes it difficult to run some operating systems. For instance, Windows 7 Home Premium eats up 7.4GB of disk space, which leaves very little room for you to install apps or load media. That said, Palombo says the computer feels pretty snappy with Windows 7, although you may also want to upgrade to 2GB of RAM.

Ubuntu Linux 11.04 also works nicely.

rest here

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