Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Is Ubuntu falling from grace?

Filed under
Ubuntu

The unthinkable is happening – Linux Mint is overtaking Ubuntu in popularity.

Watching DistroWatch.com recently, a popular aggregator for Linux distributions and a barometer of Linux distribution popularity, Ubuntu -- the darling of desktop Linux -- has at times been no longer number one. Ubuntu is threatened by its rival, Linux Mint, which recently overtook it. (Although right now, it's back in the number one spot.)

However, measuring Linux distribution popularity is far from a science. As a freely available operating system, Linux distributions can be mirrored among thousands of independently owned sites, distributed on magazine cover CDs, sold on discs and so on. Meaning it's impossible to truly know how many people are using any particular distribution of Linux.

rest here




Broken link?

The link you gave can not be opened from my IP address, it says my country has no access to the site (Romania). Please try to use stories publicly available to anyone.

re: link?

I'm sure sorry about that, but I have no way of knowing if a site is blocked by some countries. Besides, using your standard that would probably put me out of business considering some country's censoring practices.

It wasn't a long article that asserts since Linux Mint is moving up on Distrowatch's Page Hit Ranking and Ubuntu is moving down, then Ubuntu is losing popularity while Mint is gaining.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla and Add-ons

  • Firefox 40.0.3 Brings Bug-Fixes Only
  • Reactions to Mozilla’s announcement about upcoming Firefox add-on changes
  • Mixed Feelings Greet Mozilla's Add-ons Overhaul
    Also new is a requirement for add-ons to be reviewed and signed by Mozilla before their deployment. Back in April, Mozilla's security lead Daniel Veditz published The Case for Extension Signing, addressing the volume of feedback their announcement had generated from the developer community. Veditz said the internet browsing experience for tens of thousands of people was being shaped by "third party add-ons in ways they did not choose and that benefit third parties, not the user."
  • Please, God, Don't Let Mozilla Ruin Firefox
    A week ago, Mozilla shed some light on its future, laying out a plan on how the browser is going to dramatically change in the upcoming months. While most of us understood "Chrome extensions were coming to Firefox," it is not as simple as we all thought.
  • The future of Firefox Add-ons - Nope
    Once in a while, I must give my sermons, to help you figure out how things work. Why this is not going to be good for us, the users, and why we must duly prepare, in advance. As it happens, Mozilla does not fully understand the market. It truly does not. When you make decisions based on incorrect data, you are bound to make a disastrous choice. Let's try to amend this, if possible.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming