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Microsoft of old on Linux desktop, mobile and users

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Linux
Microsoft

I wrote recently about how Microsoft is now among the broadest supporters of enterprise Linux server, but when it comes to desktop PCs and laptops, mobile and converged devices and end users, Microsoft’s Linux support is a time warp back to 1998 when computers and their software were fused by proprietary sodder.

Though probably not intended as one of the new Windows 8 features to be highlighted, recent reports indicate a boot requirement in Microsoft’s latest Windows 8 OS prevents booting of Linux.

As a Linux user who has installed several different distributions on several different failed Windows machines, I’m concerned for a few reasons. One, it can be difficult to impossible to avoid the so-called ‘Microsoft tax,’ whereby Windows machines are purchased with the intention of installing Linux. Two, this is a serious limitation to the growing segment of users that like a dual-boot option with Linux. Three, what will happen to all of those PCs, laptops, netbooks and other devices after the Microsoft software becomes buggy, broken or outdated?

Rest here




UEFI Secure Boot

Win8 can lock out installing Linux, it can also at the same time lock out upgrades for Win8, in the name of preventing root-kits.

To be fair, it would prevent one of the most common methods of getting around Windows passwords by booting a Linux Live disk and using chntpw.

I tend to think the ONLY place Windows 8 belongs is in a Virtual Machine guest with a Linux/BSD host.

yeehaw, cowboys!

i can't wait for the "feature" to be implemented. it's blatantly illegal. they'll get their pants sued off of them here in europe. the previous anti-trust fine will seem like kid's play.

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