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Web erupts with Mozilla revenue speculation

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Moz/FF

The Mozilla Corporation, the commercial arm of the Mozilla Foundation, claims that despite the success of its various online applications, it is not focused on making profits but creating strong products.

Responding to online speculation around the company's actual earnings, Christopher Blizzard, who is on the board of the Mozilla Corporation, claimed on Tuesday that money is just a "tool" that allows the organisation to direct its own development and "make a great product".

"Money is one of the last things we worry about and people shouldn't get hung up on the numbers, except to realise that it gives us options," he said.

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Mozilla's Millions?

Thanks to Google, Mozilla is raking in millions of dollars of revenue, which is used to pay the employees of the recently formed Mozilla Corporation and fund project and infrastructure development.

The default start page for Firefox includes a Google search dialogue box. It also defaults to Google search in its engine option on the Search Bar within the browser navigational toolbar. Mozilla gets paid a publicly undisclosed amount for each Google search query made from Firefox by a user.

"We are very fortunate in that the search feature in Firefox is both appreciated by our users and generates revenue in the tens of millions of dollars," Mozilla head Mitchell Baker wrote in a recent blog post.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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