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Intrerview with Linus Torvalds

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Linux
Interviews

LBG: Back then what were your most optimistic and most pessimistic expectations about the Linux kernel?

I have a hard time answering that question, for the simple reason that I didn't really *have* any expectations for it. It wasn't like I had a plan for where I wanted to take Linux, and that I hoped Linux would meet - it really was this personal project that I did because I needed it myself, and because I liked the programming and the challenge.

And I think that helped Linux. Because I didn't have any huge plans or visions of where it should go, I was quite open to just about any idea. Which is not to say that I said "yes" to everything, but at least I didn't say "no" because I had some very different vision of where things would go. I'd say "no" because something was done in an ugly way, or it didn't work for me, or it had some other problem, but it meant that the project started out very open to new people and new ideas.

The fact that I also didn't have much of a local group around me meant that everything started out very much over email and there was never any "inner group" of people who knew each other from before. Again, that I think helped make for a project that didn't much care what background you had or where you came from.

LBG: What are the most interesting/important new features that will come up in the near future in the Linux kernel?

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