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One Year of Rolling with Arch/Bang

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Linux

It's just a little over a year now that I first installed ArchBang with 2010.09 that had just been released. In comments following review a poster expressed the opinion it would be interesting to see how this would develop and if it would still be working in a year from then. So here we are.

I've tweaked the install and kept it updated at my leisure, and it is still working fine. Over time the ArchBang base I started out with has turned into Arch Linux, as you would expect it to when pointing at Arch repositories.

Apparently there are some misgivings in the Arch community about the existence of ArchBang. Basically that section of the community feels ArchBang might attract a more Ubuntu-like crowd of users that is not willing to learn and configure their system the way you would have to do with Arch Linux, people looking for the easy way in. People on the Arch Linux forum professing to run ArchBang are, apparently, directed to go away and use the appropriate forum.

Rest here




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