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Gnome 3.2 reviewed

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Software




I hate it but...

...I've hated Gnome as a matter of principle ever since I realized that Nautilus was maybe the ONLY Linux file manager that doesn't have an option by default of opening the present working directory in a terminal window. You have to install a plugin for that, unlike with Konqueror, Dolphin, PCMan, Thunar, and XFE, all of which have that option by default. There is dumbed-down, and there is just plain dumb. Desktop users should NEVER be forced to use the CLI, but when you make the CLI option harder for users to discover, you're doing them a disservice. Two ways of doing something is always more powerful than one way, and nothing is more user friendly than user empowerment.

So why should I be surprised that Gnome 3 thinks it's a good idea to give users less options? I tried it. It's simple, alright, sort of like a less configurable version of fluxbox, with a docking bar attached. And, you know, lots of animations. It'll look great on a tablet, and if you have a desktop, that sucks for you. That's "the technology of the past."

One thing I like about this is the idea that Gnome and KDE are moving in different directions, and users will have a broader choice. KDE4 has been adding options, more options than I personally want and even though the default desktop seems to fracture the Desktop metaphor, the overall structure extends and empowers the desktop metaphor. I believe I could make a good case that KDE gets the most power out of the Desktop metaphor, either KDE4 or Trinity (the forked KDE3, which I prefer), more than Gnome 2, xfce or LXDE.

One good reason? If I drag and drop an object in Gnome 2, the object is moved if possible, copied if not. If I drag and drop an object in KDE, I am cued to choose: Move, copy, or link. The ability to easily create virtual links to the desktop by dragging and dropping helps me to keep work in progress in plain sight and interact with files on the desktop without moving them, and when I am done, I don't have to put everything back. I just delete the links.

I could go on. Seriously, gnome people, if you are steamed about losing your desktop metaphor, have you ever taken a good look at KDE? We have the best desktop metaphor around.

I really hated car X ever

I really hated car X ever since I found out the horn produced a lower pitch than I would have liked.

re: I really hated ...

Bad analogies are like a leaky screwdriver.

A better analogy in this case

A better analogy in this case would be a car whose seatbelt ties one hand behind the driver's back.

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