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The demise of the Windows platform

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Microsoft

I bought a Windows game last week. What I got was a scenic tour through the demise of the Windows platform. I knew that Windows as gaming platform was troublesome, but it never was as clear that it's actually moving towards irrelevance. If you ever have seriously played games on Windows you know this cocktail of driver updates, googling error messages, entering illegiible cryptic codes from stickers hidden in game boxes, waiting for online activation, going through update popups of various origins, and what not. It took me something like two hours before I was even able to start the game. I love games, and I have played quite some games on Windows, but I might be done with this now.

The free Linux desktop is mature. It's not only on par with proprietary desktops on other operating systems, it actually is innovating and moving beyond what other systems do.

Rest here




re: demise

Another linux fanboy showing how low his IQ is.

Windows as a gaming platform is both mature and stable, and DOMINATES the non-console market.

If you can't make a Windows box play the latest games - you're too stupid to have a computer, any computer - and I'm amazed you'd blog about it showing the world your complete incompetence.

Stick to your xbox - there even a retarded monkey can figure out how to put the game disk in and hit the power button.

Dude, I got to ask how low is

Dude, I got to ask how low is your IQ, do you even realise who Cornelius is? He's certainly a damn sight smarter than you are, your resorting to dumb insults instead of trying to argue facts or opinions just proves it.

And in case you hadn't noticed, this is a Linux site, what did you expect, MS fanbois?

John.

re: Dude

Um...he's a code monkey for KDE.

Which doesn't even fly close to real academia, or require anything more then a mediocre IQ, hence his inability to run Window Games that any 12 year old kid can without blogging about how "hard" it is.

His blog article was nothing but a cheap shot by a Linux fanboy trying to add FUD to Windows Gaming.

It's ironic that all the Linux Fanboys fail to recognize a very simple marketing metric - if you give your product away for free, and it still has a rounding error of a market share - then your product is NOT better then it's non-free competition. People love free, unless it sucks, then they're willing to pay for something that doesn't suck.

OS's are just technology. Linux does some things well, Windows does some thing well. What irks the hell out of me is the Linux fanboys that think Linux is the second coming of christ and will cure all the world ills. It doesn't, and it won't - it's just a piece of software.

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