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Open source jobs: What's hot, where to look, what to learn

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OSS

What does the future hold for eager, talented software developers, and people with related essential skill sets? The overriding trend, as in all industries, is you're on your own, chum. But free/open source software (FOSS) offers considerably more richness of opportunity than anything else. Let's peer into the crystal ball and see what the future holds.

FOSS is everywhere

There was a brief, shining era in America when people actually built careers at single companies. It was possible to work at the same company, or at least in the same industry, your whole life, enjoy some nice benefits, and retire with a pension. Good luck finding anything like that now. The new rule of the modern economy is whatever happens to us, it's all our fault. But all is not woe, for FOSS fuels the modern economy, and that is where the growth and opportunities are.

rest here




Books?

How do people feel about learning out of Linux books? I like them and I feel the information goes much deeper than most websites and HowTos, but the info does get old, some details more quickly than others...
http://gnuski.blogspot.com/2011/10/top-rated-low-power-linux-learning.html

Books

I think the best way to learn something in this community is through repetitive action. If you learn something from a book you may not retain it all unless you use it on a regular basis. A good way to do this with a book is to learn a small section, even just part of a chapter. Then you repeat the process numerous times until you can do it with your eyes closed.

The other way is similar, and cheaper, just follow any howto/tutorial that you're interested in and repeat the process a number of times, There's nothing like practical experience to help you learn.

Keep your stick on the ice...

Landor

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