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Unity or Gnome Shell?

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Ubuntu

NOW that the latest version of Ubuntu Linux (11.10) is out, users who upgrade must decide whether to stick with its default Unity interface or use some other desktop.

Unity, which drew a lot of flak in its earlier reincarnation, seems to have matured with the latest Ubuntu release. Performance is snappier, and the Dash has received a major face lift that makes it look sleek and professional.

On my old Acer Aspire One, I ran into occasional hiccups, probably because the built-in graphics on the netbook isn’t all that hot. Still, Unity was much more responsive than it was when I first tried it out some months ago.

rest here




Both Shells

I think it's hard right now to make any kind of real comparison between the two shells. They're both rapidly improving, and in different areas. One thing I do find, and it's not a negative, that currently Unity's improvements have been mostly seen in aesthetics and speed, not all of course. While GNOME Shell's improvements have largely been in functionality. That makes it hard to measure the two point for point.

I think a true comparison of them would be better suited in another year. We'll definitely see far more stability and polish overall, as well as being able to clearly see the direction both projects are moving towards.

Keep your stick on the ice...

Landor

It's all about the Desktop metaphor.

Unity has a Desktop, a place where you can drop links to work in progress for easy reference, and Gnome doesn't. To my way of thinking, that makes Unity a good idea.

I disagree with Linus. Gnome Shell is not an "unholy mess". It's much too simple to be any kind of mess. To me, gnome sort of looks like FVWM with a better menu and less configuration options. I'm serious, check out those workspaces!

FVWM doesn't crash my computer, however. There seems to be no way to disable the hibernate mode, and when that happens there's no way to get my computer running, except a reboot. Like Linus, i am not a fan.

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