Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Happy 15th to the folk at the KDE project

Filed under
KDE

I first encountered KDE when it was in version 1.1 when a friend in India told me of a distribution which was the same as Red Hat - I was playing around with 5.2 at the time which was using the FVWM window manager - but had KDE instead. This distro was then known as Mandrake; today we know it as Mandriva.

Instead of using Mandrake, I downloaded KDE 1.1 and installed it on Red Hat; it was very nice and light years ahead of all the other DEs with which I had been playing around. Applications like KMail were nicely designed; kppp was really useful because at that time everyone was on a 56k internet connection. Additionally, for a GNU/Linux beginner, kppp was much more user-friendly than tools like minicom.

Over the years, KDE has added a huge number of applications; the one that stands out for me is k3b, the CD/DVD burning application that is quite simply the best of its kind even when one compares other platforms.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu-Based ExLight Linux OS Is One of the Few to Use Latest Enlightenment 0.22

ExLight Build 171121 replaces last week's Build 171112, which used the older Enlightenment 0.20 desktop from the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) software repositories, to update Enlightenment to the latest 0.22 release that the developer compiled from sources. This makes ExLight one of few distros to use Enlightenment 0.22. "Version 171112 uses Enlightenment 0.20 installed from Ubuntu’s repositories. Build 171121 of ExLight uses Enlightenment 0.22 installed by me from source," said the developer in the release announcement. "Only two Linux distributions in the whole wide world (besides ExLight) use Enlightenment 0.22 as desktop environment." Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 Users Get Major Kernel Update, 20 Security Vulnerabilities Patched

If you're using the latest Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system on your personal computer, you should know that it received it's first major kernel update since the official release back in October 19, 2017. The update addresses a total of 20 security vulnerabilities for Ubuntu 17.10's Linux 4.13 kernel packages, including the Raspberry Pi 2 one. Among the security issues patched in this update, five are related to Linux kernel's USB subsystem, including a use-after-free vulnerability, which could allow a physically proximate attacker to crash the affected system by causing a denial of service (DoS attack) or possibly execute arbitrary code. Other three are related to the ALSA subsystem, including a race condition. Read more

Samsung DeX will finally give life to the Linux smartphone

Remember when Canonical was doing everything they could to bring convergence between the Linux desktop and the Ubuntu Phone? They worked tirelessly to make it happen, only to fall short of that goal. This effort was preceded by Ubuntu Edge—a smartphone that, by itself, would bridge the mobile device and the desktop. That failed as well, but the intent was the same. For those that aren't familiar, the idea behind convergence is simple: Offer a single device that could serve as both a smartphone handset, and when connected to a monitor work as a standard desktop computer. The idea is quite brilliant and makes perfect sense. Especially when you remember how many people use a smartphone as their only means of either connecting to the world or productivity. With that number growing every year, the idea of convergence becomes even more important. Give them one device that could function in two very important ways. Read more Also: Samsung Galaxy S8 Icon Theme for KDE Plasma

today's howtos