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So What Does 15 Years Of KDE Look Like?

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KDE

So, I thought I would take a quick look at what KDE community “looks” like after 15 years under development. So here I will briefly show off three visualisations with no particular comment. I will just leave them here for your amusement.

So let’s start with the now-infamous green blobs:

For the uninitiated, a quick lesson: Each column in this visualisation represents the commit history of everyone who has committed to KDE SVN. Each row represents a week, with the most recent weeks being at the top. If the contributor committed during that week, they get a green blob, otherwise it is left empty. For each column the committer, the date of their first commit and the % of weeks in which they committed (of those they /could/) is given.

rest here




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