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Linux Foundation wades into Windows 8 secure boot controversy

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The Linux Foundation today released technical guidance to PC makers on how to implement secure UEFI without locking Linux or other free software off of new Windows 8 machines. The guidance included a subtle tisk-tisk at Microsoft's Steven Sinofsky for suggesting that PC owners won't want to mess with control of their hardware and would happily concede that to operating system makers and hardware manufacturers.

Hey why should the Free Software Foundation get the last word, with its anti-secure-boot petition?

To recap: The next-generation boot specification is known as Unified Extensible Firmware Interface. Microsoft is requiring Windows 8 PC makers to use UEFI's secure boot protocol to qualify for Microsoft's Windows 8 logo program. Secure UEFI is intended to thwart rootkit infections by using a key infrastructure before allowing executables or drivers to be loaded onto the device. Problem is, such keys can also be used to keep the PC's owner from wiping out the current OS and installing another option such as Linux. It can also prevent them from loading their own device drivers.

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Also: Making UEFI Secure Boot Work With Open Platforms

And: Linux Foundation, Canonical and Red Hat Weigh In On Secure Boot

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