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What People Are Saying About GNOME [Part 2]

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Software

A few days ago I shared the first one thousand comments about the GNOME desktop from the 2011 GNOME User Survey. Here's now the next set of one thousand comments concerning the state of GNOME in the eyes of end-users.

1001: Add features back in that have been taken away for simplicity. Add a "System" menu to the new gnome-session-fallback. Remove the "mac-like" approach at a single application for preferences. Bring back the toolbar in Nautilus.

Listen to your end users for once.

1002: The main thing I'd like is for Gnome to have the ability to save and restore workspace layouts. I have several tasks that I regularly do that involve opening a couple terminals, gedit, etc. and I like to have them arranged in a certain way. If Gnome could group all that together and save it to be restored later, that would make it much easier to do work.

Evolution needs some serious work, especially in terms of interface, though I'm very happy with how it has progressed recently in terms of integrating with Gmail, Google Calendar and the like.

I can't really think of a third thing to change at the moment.

Rest here




Just use KDE...

"I personally just encourage people to switch to KDE. This 'users are idiots, and are confused by functionality' mentality of Gnome is a disease. If you think your users are idiots, only idiots will use it. I don't use Gnome, because in striving to be simple, it has long since reached the point where it simply doesn't do what I need it to do. Please, just tell people to use KDE." - Linus Torvalds

"Gnome seems to be developed by interface nazis, where consistently the excuse for not doing something is not 'it's too complicated to do', but 'it would confuse users'." - Linux Torvalds

Gnone Shell and the AMD fglrx driver

I use the AMD fglrx driver and it works with every desktop except for Gnome Shell. Gnome Shell just glitches the screen and all the menu dialogs are slanted and unreadable. This has been going on for months and nobody at Gnome wants to fix a damn thing. They tried to dump it on the AMD developers who have been able to fix the panel but not much else.

fglrx sux

Texstar, I believe it's AMD fault to be honest; with the open source driver (in F16) Gnome Shell work sperfectly, at least on my Radeon HD 3200 Graphics (s/HD/crap anyway); how do you explain that?

ATI/AMD Catalyst 11.10 still broken…

Gnome Shell

Nux wrote:
Texstar, I believe it's AMD fault to be honest; with the open source driver (in F16) Gnome Shell work sperfectly, at least on my Radeon HD 3200 Graphics (s/HD/crap anyway); how do you explain that?

fglrx works with every desktop except Gnome Shell. How do you explain that? lol Gnome 3 Classic works with my openssource driver but not Gnome Shell.

AMD Catalyst 11.12 Will Be Even Better

phoronix.com: Catalyst 11.10 was released yesterday for Linux and Windows platforms. Many Linux users are pleased by this driver update as can be seen from the forums, but Catalyst 11.12 is set to improve the Radeon binary blob situation even more.

Rest here

Yeah, you also have a point.

@texstar

Yeah, you also have a point. This situation is weird anyway and probably the truth is somewhere in the middle as usual. What makes me think it's somehow AMD's "fault" is that when G3 was released in Fedora the nvidia and intel drivers just worked.
W.r.t. your open source driver issue, maybe you should upgrade it. The open source driver in Fedora 15 wasn't working with G3 either for me, but Fedora 16 is really nice and snappy.

Anyway, are we going to see G3 in PCLOS? Big Grin

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