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Stallman parody site catches Stallman's attention

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A recent online posting of Richard Stallman's astonishingly long set of instructions for those who would hire him as an event speaker has spawned a parody Web site - The Stallman Dialogues - as well as some debate over the propriety of poking fun at the enigmatic and controversial founder of the Free Software Foundation.

Stallman himself has an opinion on the latter issue, which we'll get to at the end of this post.

First, there's the instruction manual - we'll call it the "How to Hire Richard Stallman Manifesto" - which covers everything from his preferences in air travel - coach over business class, with the caveat that he would appreciate being paid the difference in the fares; hotels - he hates them and would prefer someone's couch; beverages - tea with milk and sugar, unless it's tea he really likes (oddly unspecified), in which case no milk or sugar is necessary, and non-diet Pepsi rather than Coke, since he dislikes the taste of all diet soda and he's boycotting Coca-Cola;

rest here




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