Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

How Microsoft Learned to Stop Worrying and (Almost) Love Open Source

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Sam Ramji insisted that he wasn’t joking, that he wasn’t crazy, and that he hadn’t joined some sort of dark Microsoft conspiracy.

The year was 2006, and Ramji had just been named Microsoft’s head of open source software strategy. Up to then, Redmond’s most famous contribution to the open source community was CEO Steve Ballmer comparing Linux to a malignant cancer. Even Ramji was skeptical — and a little afraid — of his new job.

The job would involve speaking to, in his words, “fairly polarized” audiences across the software world. “Polarized” is a bit of a euphemism. “That was a doubly scary proposition as I was not a public speaker and I knew the audiences quite well,” Ramji said later, indicating he too was once part of this hostile audience — i.e. the open source lovers who hung out on sites like Slashdot.org. “I’d competed with Microsoft for many years in prior companies and used Slashdot as my homepage.”

But ultimately, Ramji decided he could help change not only Microsoft — but also the general perception that the company is the mortal enemy of open source software.

Rest here




More in Tux Machines

4MLinux 19.0 Distro to Ship with GCC 6.1.0 and Qt 5.7, Public Beta Out Now

Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia about the availability of the public Beta release f his upcoming 4MLinux 19.0 GNU/Linux distribution, which comes one week after the release of the 4MLinux 19.0 Core edition. As reported by us in the second week of July, the Beta release of 4MLinux 19.0 Core, which the developer uses as the base for all the distributions and distrolettes that are being distributed as part of the 4MLinux family, including 4MParted, 4MRescueKit, BakAndImgCD, 4MRecover, and Antivirus Live CD, the operating system uses the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) 6.1.0. Read more

Weekend in Techrights

Why Open Source is gaining momentum in Digital Transformation?

Once upon a time in IT, using open source simply meant Linux instead of Windows, or maybe MySQL instead of Oracle. Now, there is such a huge diversity of open source tools, and almost every leading digital business and tech startup is making extensive use of them. It’s been a remarkable turnaround for open source over the last 10 years, placing the trend firmly at the heart of the digital revolution. Read more