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Browser war 2.0

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Software

A new browser war is brewing and is promising fireworks. The new browsers like Opera, Firefox, Netscape, Safari and Mozilla are clearly making their own place. Microsoft has upped its ante too and is soon releasing a new version of its Internet explorer. Beta version is already out. Claims and counter-claims of which is the more secure browser are also doing rounds.

Though the new kids on the block are surely making their presence felt, Microsoft's dominance is clearly far from over. A third party web research firm, Netapplications pegs Microsoft's market share at 87.2% at the end of 2005, though down from 90% at 2004-end. Other players like Firefox, Safari and Netscape don't even come close.

Even IE's biggest competitor, Firefox has a market share below 10%.
The reasons are not hard to find. With 97% of world's PCs equipped with Microsoft Windows, IE has an obvious advantage. Why is then excitement building in a market where products come free?

Full Story.

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