Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux, Open-Source Affected In AMD Cutbacks?

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

By now many of you have likely heard that AMD is laying off around 10% of its workforce by next year in a restructuring attempt to lower its operating costs, but will their open-source and Linux efforts be hampered by this move?

Initial indications are that AMD's Linux and open-source efforts will not be severely hit as AMD lets go of around 1400 employees worldwide.

AMD's John Bridgman has commented in our forums that they're still there. In particular, him and Alex Deucher along with their new open-source employees: Michel Dänzer, Tom Stellard, and Christian König. Even laying off one of these five open-source Linux graphics developers would be a significant (20%) hit.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Raspberry Pi 101 – An Introduction to the Raspberry Pi GPIO

An important feature of the Raspberry Pi is the row of GPIO pins, where GPIO stands for general purpose input/output. It will allow us to communicate between Pi and the outside world. We have 40pins on Pi, we count these pins from left to right out of which seventeen pins are GPIO pins. Different pins are used for the different functions and can be connected to a number of external peripherals such as buttons, lights, relays, sensors, etc. Read more

Intel Pentium vs. AMD Ryzen 3 Performance For Linux Gaming

For those that may be looking to assemble a new low-end Linux gaming system in early 2018, here is a look at the Linux gaming performance of an Intel Pentium (Kabylake) processor to an AMD Ryzen 3 while testing with the GeForce GTX 1050 and Radeon RX 560 graphics cards. Read more

Containers, the GPL, and copyleft: No reason for concern

Though open source is thoroughly mainstream, new software technologies and old technologies that get newly popularized sometimes inspire hand-wringing about open source licenses. Most often the concern is about the GNU General Public License (GPL), and specifically the scope of its copyleft requirement, which is often described (somewhat misleadingly) as the GPL’s derivative work issue. One imperfect way of framing the question is whether GPL-licensed code, when combined in some sense with proprietary code, forms a single modified work such that the proprietary code could be interpreted as being subject to the terms of the GPL. While we haven’t yet seen much of that concern directed to Linux containers, we expect more questions to be raised as adoption of containers continues to grow. But it’s fairly straightforward to show that containers do not raise new or concerning GPL scope issues. Read more