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GNOME Shell Works Without GPU Driver Support

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Software

These improvements allow the desktop effects to all be done on the CPU without any dependence on any GPU hardware driver. GNOME Shell on the VESA driver or within a KVM/QEMU guest is fair game.

Having returned from the Ubuntu 12.04 developer summit this weekend, I pulled the latest Fedora Rawhide packages on Sunday morning. These packages will ultimately be part of Fedora 17 (a.k.a. the Beefy Miracle, and not to be confused with the release of Fedora 16 this coming week).

rest here




GNOME shell

I wish the GNOME people the best in their quest to get GNOME Shell working on the widest variety of hardware.

I am a recent GNU/Linux user, the first Linux which I was successful in running was Knoppix 5.1.1. Afterwards, I ran Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty and PCLinuxOS in triple boot with my Windows XP, when my Windows updates didn't clobber GRUB.

KDE 4.0 persuaded me that I didn't want to run the KDE desktop until the dust had settled. GNOME 3.0 has persuaded me that I couldn't run GNOME or even Unity, so I switched to Xfce on Debian and Xubuntu, mostly because my desktop was not outfitted to support hardware graphics acceleration. I hadn't needed the spinning cube to persuade me to change, and I didn't want to change computers just because the desktop required it. That was the reason I didn't, ever, do more than try Windows Vista.

Why, oh why, should middle of the road 5 year old hardware be junked just because the software developers want more bling? Especially when the owner doesn't run any MMORG or FPS games, nor wish to do so?

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