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I hate Unity. I hate GNOME. I hate Windows 8. The ultimate desktop search continues.

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Software

I’ve complained for years that since the release of Windows 95 that operating systems have stagnated and have all converged on that same look and feel that began the Great Desktop Revolution way back in 1995. I observed a nasty trend in 1996, when I first saw FVWM95. It was cute and clever and it was Linux with that same great Windows 95 theme going on. Though it took some getting used to, I was a relatively early adopter of Windows 95–yes, before Microsoft fixed it with Windows 95B.

But, still somehow I wanted Linux to be different and better than its arch nemesis from the great NorthWest. Linux should be better. It should look better, respond better, perform better and be better because it’s free. I’m finding, however, that even free isn’t good enough because I’m still in search of the ultimate desktop.

Rest ehre




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